WNY Fly Fishing Private Lessons

I offer private lessons for fly casting and fly tying, the cost in $60.00 per student for two hours for casting, equipment, knots and general fly fishing and $40.00 per student for fly tying; I supply all materials for the tying class. You must bring your own vise and tools. E mail me at jimguida@hotmail.com











Flies For Sale

My Patterns are as follows: Guida's Mirrored Minnows $2.50 ea, Guida's White Lighting/Black Thunder $2.00 ea, Guida's Emerald Shiners $2.00 ea, Hairballs, sucker spawn, single eggs $.75 ea all orders must be in Qty's of 5's or 10's per style
e-mail orders to jimguida@hotmail.com

WNY Fly Fishing Trout Camps

We offer Trout Camps in the spring for inland trout. The classes are one day and cover casting, fly selection, and reading the water. We provide lunch, guides, flies/leaders/tippet, rods and reels if needed, you must bring waders and wading boots, sunglasses. This is the best way to start out fly fishing and learn from some of the best instructors in WNY.

Cost is $250.00 per person $350.00 per two
Please call Brian Slavinski for group rates
716-834-4331















Tuesday, October 31, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream Report 10/31/2017

Wide spread blowout on all streams in WNY, the smaller ones will come down first in a day or two the Catt will take longer. Watch the gauges and choose wisely otherwise you will be driving all over the place to find water, I'll keep up the posts as I hear the conditions  from the guys

Sunday, October 29, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream Report 10/29/2017

Well the rains we needed for the small to med sized tribs are here and everything is on the rise, the Catt is unfishable for now and with more rain coming it might be done for awhile.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream Report 19/24/2017

The creeks are on the rise with this storm coming in, the smaller creeks need it. The catt was fishing very well according to all the reports I have been getting. We will have to see what it does to the fishing.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream News - New USGS Meters on Creeks

USGS Current Water Data for New York has new creeks on it. The gauges only show you height for now, but this is a big help for you. It will take some time to figure out the heights and when we have them worked out I will post them.

USGS 04213319 CHAUTAUQUA CREEK BELOW WESTFIELD NY
 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ny/nwis/uv?site_no=04213319
 USGS 04213376 CANADAWAY CREEK AT FREDONIA NY
 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ny/nwis/uv?site_no=04213376
 USGS 04213401 WALNUT CREEK AT US ROUTE 20 AT SILVER CREEK NY
 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ny/nwis/uv?site_no=04213401
 USGS 04214060 BIG SISTER CREEK AT EVANS CENTER NY
 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ny/nwis/uv?site_no=04214060
 USGS 0421422210 EIGHTEENMILE CREEK AT HAMBURG NY
 https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ny/nwis/uv?site_no=0421422210

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing - Trip Spotlight - Pesca Panama.


Guides, outfitters, shops, agents, captains, clubs: boat, bluewater big game, inshore, surf, fly, troll, jig, popper, live bait, light tackle- over 50 species- WE DO IT ALL IN ONE WEEK at Pesca Panama's floating lodge- one of the world's famous premier fishing destinations. Contact me for info about our generous % offering when sending, arranging, or leading groups of male and female anglers. We have only one open boat in December, several weeks in January and Febuary, and a few in June for the upcoming season. Capt Mike Augat- 716 868 4432 or mike@mikeaugat.com. Checkout www.pescapanama.com 
Imagine a fishing destination where you can catch seemingly an unlimited number of species of world class saltwater game fish. This perfectly describes the Coiba Island Archipelagos, which includes the world famous “Hannibal Bank,” all located on the Pacific Ocean side of Panama. This is the extraordinary world of Pesca Panama Sportfishing. As our guests, you will be treated to a unique saltwater fishing adventure in a truly exotic landscape of pristine ocean waters and lush tropical islands that could well exceed anything you have ever imagined. Unlike Panama’s shorebound resorts, our floating lodge keeps you close to the best fishing action at all times. Our fleet of five Ocean Masters, 17' Panga and four Ocean Kayaks, means shorter runs to the fishing grounds. That translates into much more fishing time than for anglers having to range up to 100 miles per day to-and-from Panama’s mainland fishing resorts. So, if you’re passionate about your saltwater fishing, that’s reason enough to fish with Pesca Panama.

I have fished with Mike for years and you will not find a better capt/guide, the man knows his stuff and the fishery is OUTSTANDING!!!!! fly or spin give him a shout, he also does Alaska too.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing - Good Read - Hatch Magazine

Those Spots in Front of Rocks

Fishing the hydraulic cushion
Rocks and boulders are a friend to even the most novice of anglers. Why? Because rocks make it easy to read the water, a task that can be particularly challenging for beginners but also one that remains complex for even the most seasoned of fly fishers.
Big rocks form pools behind them where fish can shelter from even the stiffest of stream flows and pick food from the currents that slip by on other side. Rocks break and channel currents, creating seams of fast and slow water where trout congregate to feed. There's an intuitive sense that these rock-formed stream features should hold fish. It makes sense. The rocks both break up and concentrate flows, offering not only opportunities for shelter from brisk currents but a stab at a high density stream of river food.
But some of the most productive spots in the river, which exist solely thanks to the rocks that create them, are more seldom fished because -- to many anglers -- they are not imagined to be places of refuge, places of opportunity. These are the spots in front of rocks.
Our brains tell most of us something entirely different about these places in front of rocks: that they are inhospitable, possibly even uninhabitable locations within a river made so my the charging onslaught of heavy currents. So we don't look, we don't observe.
And at first this seems to make sense. When we wade into a heavy current, the river's flow slams against our legs and bodies. Anything that flows towards us in the river -- bugs, debris, our fly lines -- is swept, with haste, as it forks to either side of us, led by the current that our bodies have broken and accelerated. We look behind us, and the water is calm and serene, thanks to the refuge we've created in the current. But in front of us? Mayhem.

But reality can be deceiving, especially if you're letting your brain distract you from what your eyes can plainly see. Rocks, people and any other obstructions placed into a moving current most certainly create the kind of havoc described above, splitting and accelerating that current. That's the intuitive part. The part that isn't is where that split, that break, occurs. As observation reveals, it doesn't occur where the rushing water meets the rock, or your leg or other barrier. Rather, it occurs anywhere from a few inches to several feet in front of the obstruction. The spaces that exists in between the obstruction and that splitting current are some of the most productive feeding lies on any given stream.

This impressive Agulapak River rainbow trout had taken up residence in front of a rock, calmly finning in the cushion, sipping pale morning duns that drifted along the edges of the slip. (photo: Chad Shmukler)
These spaces are characterized by slow, soft water at the front of which is a conveyor belt of food. And these spaces are a favorite of trout. Once you look, these formerly counter-intuitive stream forms are painfully easy to see. Water rushing to meet a big boulder rebounds, pushing back upstream a bit. The mixing of the rushing current and the water rebounding off the boulder behind it forms an area of placid, serene water which is typically referred to as the hydraulic cushion.
Depending on the size of the boulder or other obstruction, these cushions can be big or small. Big rocks create big cushions, small rocks create small ones, but even the smallest cushions will often hold fish on streams with healthy trout populations.
These areas are often most easily fished from above, with a down-and-across or downstream approach. Almost any strategy will work, drifting dry flies or nymphs, swinging wet flies or streamers, you name it. Whatever strategy you employ, be sure to explore the spaces in front or rocks. You'll be glad you did.

Monday, October 9, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream Report 10/9/2017

The catt is going up and thats a good thing we needed the water, alot of the smaller tribs are the same, so with that in mind the creeks will get a push of fresh fish in the next couple of days and with the cooler temps the game will be on.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

WNY Fly Fishing Stream Reoprt 10/8/2017

The Catt is coming along slowly with most of the fish down low,  above and below the thruway. The fish have been taking streamers and egg patterns. We need rain and cooler temps to bring in a big push of fish to fill the system. The smaller creek need water to bring the fish in, 18 mile Hamburg has fish in it at old lake shore bridge, the water is low and clear which makes rhem very hard to catch.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

NYSDEC Trout Stream Management and Stocking in NYS

NYSDEC Trout Stream Management and Stocking in NYS NYSDEC
33 members of the public in attendance
Slides, Bullet Points and Take Aways
Presentation by Fred Henson - Cold Water Fisheries Unit Leader - Albany Office
Outline of Current Management Approach -
CROTS (Catch Rate Oriented Trout Stocking) is a management strategy that has been implemented since 1990 (see slide) - the metric to measure angler satisfaction is based on a catch rate objective of 1 trout per 2 hours of “average” angler effort, achieved by increasing or decreasing numbers of trout stocked. To determine the number of trout to stock that will achieve the CROTS objective, biologists factor a estimation of carrying capacity vs.estimation of total angling effort then deduct an estimation of wild trout per mile to allocate the proper number of stocked fish.
Various factors like climate change, increased catch and release ethics, decreased angler effort, a 7x higher rate of non angling loss of stocked trout due to predation, habitat loss, poor water quality, extreme winters, extreme drought and floods have prompted the NYSDEC to focus on a “2017 trout management strategy rethink”
2015 State Wide Study Results -
9 high quality trout streams that hold both wild and stocked trout were examined in 2015 though biologic assessment and angler surveys across NYS. East Coy creek was the WNY stream selected for the study. KEY STATEWIDE FINDINGS (see slide) - large decrease in angling effort (pressure) statewide since 1990 - much lower harvest rates statewide - 7x higher rate of non angling loss of stocked trout through electroshock survey of fin clipped fish statewide, no significant overwinter survival of stocked trout in any of the 9 surveyed streams (natural predation, outmigration, water quality and climate change were all contributing factors) - historical estimation of stream carrying capacity was checked and validated.
Presenter Fred Henson then asked attendees to imagine that managing the fishery was like controlling “a instrument panel with knobs and dials.” (see slide) The findings of the 2015 statewide trout stream survey has prompted the NYSDEC fisheries unit to reevaluate “as managers, how can we change the dials to create a higher quality angling experience”. (see slide)
Open Discussion - at the conclusion of the presentation, Fred Henson asked “Should the NYSDEC continue to use the CROTS management approach and if not, “what is the scale we should use to measure the public's angling satisfaction?”
Public comments included -
Advocating for the Stocking of trout in the Oatka Creek Park Section (a wild trout managed catch and release regulated section of steam) - increasing the overall number of trout stocked statewide - increasing the target catch rate per hour objective statewide - increasing dry fly fishing opportunities - observations of a decrease in quality of trout fishing in wny since the 70's and disappearance of little black caddis - concerns about poor water quality, poor bug hatches and effluence of large factory farms and spreading of manure - implementing enhancements to trout stocking methodology by allowing volunteers to better disperse hatchery trout - better enforcement of existing laws - develop higher quality hatchery trout - decrease or eliminate the stocking of trout in marginal urban trout streams like buffalo and cayuga creek and stock those trout elsewhere.
Of the 19 public comments recorded by the NYSDEC I tallied only 4 specifically in favor of shifting the current management objectives of using stocked trout to obtain a target CROTS metric to a measurement of fishery quality that includes the identification, enhancement and monitoring of wild trout streams and trout habitat.
If you were not able to attend this meeting and would like contribute any thoughts you may have on the discussion, please email region9@dec.ny.gov Your participation and feedback matters.

Total Pageviews

Search My Blog

WNY Hatch Chart

Name Size Dates
Stoneflies 10-18 April - September
B.W.O 18-22 April - September
Hendrickson 12-14 April - May
Black Caddis 16-18 March - May
Caddis 14-18 April - September
March Brown 10-12 May - June
Grey Fox 12-14 May - June
Sulpher 14-18 May - June
P.M.D. 16-20 May - June
Lt. Cahill 14-16 June - July
Green Drake 8-10 May - June
Isonchia 12-14 June - August
Yellow Stonefly 12-14 June - September
Hexagina 6-8 June - July
Trico 20-24 July - September

Ants 16-22 June - September
Beetles 12-16 June - September
Flying Ants 16-18 June - September
Hoppers 10-12 August
Crickets 10-12 August

USGS Height Gage

USGS Height Gage

Flow Rate Guide

Oatka Creek
2.60 – 2.80 low water flows·
2.80 – 3.00 moderate flows·
3.00 – 3.20 good fishing flow·
3.20 – 3.40 starting to rise·
3.40 – 3.60 High Water


Genesee River near Wellsville
100 – 200cfs Summer Flows Low water
200 – 300cfs Summer Flows Good Water
300 – 400cfs Spring Flows Fishable·
400 – 500cfs Spring Flows High Water·
650cfs + Stay Home


Cattaraugus Creek

Cattaraugus in Fall
100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Fishable Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs Stay Home Tie Flies


Cattaraugus in Spring

100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Normal Fishing Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs + Stay Home Tie Flies

Followers

Mirrored Minnow

Mirrored Minnow

Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner

Emilee's Spey

Emilee's Spey

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

Simple Sculpin

Simple Sculpin

Hairball

Hairball

Rabbit Leech

Rabbit Leech

Hare's Ear Wet

Hare's Ear Wet

Peacock Emerger

Peacock Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Euro Nymphs

Euro Nymphs

Blog Archive