WNY Fly Fishing Private Lessons

I offer private lessons for fly casting and fly tying, the cost in $60.00 per student for two hours for casting, equipment, knots and general fly fishing and $40.00 per student for fly tying; I supply all materials for the tying class. You must bring your own vise and tools. E mail me at jimguida@hotmail.com











About Me

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I have been teaching fly fishing for about 25 years now and have made some great friends along the way, I also am a Umpqua Signature fly designer and a Pro Staffer for Scientific Anglers and Ross Reels

Flies For Sale

My Patterns are as follows: Guida's Mirrored Minnows $2.50 ea, Guida's White Lighting/Black Thunder $2.00 ea, Guida's Emerald Shiners $2.00 ea, Hairballs, sucker spawn, single eggs $.75 ea all orders must be in Qty's of 5's or 10's per style
e-mail orders to jimguida@hotmail.com

WNY Fly Fishing Trout Camps

We offer Trout Camps in the spring for inland trout. The classes are one day and cover casting, fly selection, and reading the water. We provide lunch, guides, flies/leaders/tippet, rods and reels if needed, you must bring waders and wading boots, sunglasses. This is the best way to start out fly fishing and learn from some of the best instructors in WNY.

Cost is $250.00 per person $350.00 per two
Please call Brian Slavinski for group rates
716-834-4331















Sunday, December 23, 2007

Fly Fishing's Most common Terms

Fly fishing has a wealth of terms used to describe the myriad of equipment, techniques, fish and insect behavior. Some of these terms may be unclear or confusing for the newcomer to fly fishing.

Backing - Some game fish, like salmon, steelhead, bonefish, tarpon, and many other saltwater species, will take a fly and run for up to 200 yards before you can slow them down. Since a fly line is only about 100 feet long, there has to be some kind of insurance beyond the fly line so you stay connected. Backing is a thin, strong line that is attached to the reel at one end and the fly line at the other. For most trout fishing, 50 yards is plenty. When fishing for saltwater speed demons like bonefish or permit, the fish of a lifetime might take 200 yards so you need to be prepared.

Drag - in describing the behavior of a fly on the water, is where a dry fly or nymph does not act as though it is drifting naturally. Usually occurs when the line and leader skate the fly across conflicting currents. It can be avoided be using the correct leader and proper technique.In a fly reel, the drag is a mechanical system that puts smooth pressure on a running fish to help slow it down. In essence it’s the brake on your fly reel. Drag is applied by putting pressure on plates made from metal, cork, composites, or a combination of the three. Dry Flies - Dry flies are flies that float, and imitate aquatic or terrestrial insects. They are actually heavier than water, but float via materials and construction that pins them in the surface film. Dry flies float better when treated with fly floatants, which utilize silicone or other hydrophobic materials to keep a fly floating.

Emergers are halfway between dry flies and nymphs. They float right in the surface film or just below the surface, and imitate an aquatic insect as it is trying to shed its shuck and transform into a winged adult. Many anglers feel emergers are more effective than standard dry flies during a hatch.

Leader - Because fly lines are heavy and opaque, there must be a relatively invisible and flexible connection between the line and the fly. The leader serves this purpose. Like a fly line, a leader is tapered so that it presents the fly properly.

Tippet - The last part of a leader, the skinny part that attaches to the fly, is called the tippet. On knotless leaders this is an integral part of the leader as knotless leaders are one continuous strand of material. However, as new flies are added and removed from the leader, the tippet gets too short and heavy. Fly fishers carry extra spools of tippet rather than replacing the whole leader.

Nymphs are specific or general imitations of aquatic insects, crustaceans, or aquatic worms. They are more realistic than wet flies and most anglers feel they are more effective. Nymphs can be fished close to the surface during a hatch of insects, or along the steam bed at times when trout are not feeding on the surface. To get nymphs close to the bottom, they can be weighted with metal wire (added to the hook before the fly is tied), or they can be made with brass or tungsten beads attached.

Wet Flies - All flies that sink can be considered wet flies, but there are specific wet flies as opposed to nymphs, streamers, and saltwater and salmon flies. Wet flies are older imitations of emerging aquatic insects and are very effective flies at the beginning of a hatch, when insects are rising toward the surface. However, nymphs, more specific imitations of aquatic insects, are far more popular today.

Fluorocarbon - They are also almost invisible in water (as compared to nylon) because the index of refraction of PVDF (polyvinylidenfluoride) is very close to water. PVDF (polyvinylidenfluoride) leaders and tippet sink faster than nylon and are more expensive.

Fly Line - The weighted line cast by a fly rod. Fly lines are between 80 and 105 feet long. Fly lines can be floating lines, which stay on the surface for fishing on the surface or in shallow water. They get their floating ability from micro balloons, tiny glass bubbles incorporated into the fly line coating. Floating lines are also the most popular fly lines by a wide margin. They can also be made in intermediate densities, which mean they sink very slowly. Some fly lines sink very quickly and are called sinking lines, and some sink at the front end (closest to the fly) but float for the rest of their length, and are called sinking tip lines. All fly lines are tapered so they present the leader and fly in an efficient manner.

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WNY Hatch Chart

Name Size Dates
Stoneflies 10-18 April - September
B.W.O 18-22 April - September
Hendrickson 12-14 April - May
Black Caddis 16-18 March - May
Caddis 14-18 April - September
March Brown 10-12 May - June
Grey Fox 12-14 May - June
Sulpher 14-18 May - June
P.M.D. 16-20 May - June
Lt. Cahill 14-16 June - July
Green Drake 8-10 May - June
Isonchia 12-14 June - August
Yellow Stonefly 12-14 June - September
Hexagina 6-8 June - July
Trico 20-24 July - September

Ants 16-22 June - September
Beetles 12-16 June - September
Flying Ants 16-18 June - September
Hoppers 10-12 August
Crickets 10-12 August

USGS Height Gage

USGS Height Gage

Flow Rate Guide

Oatka Creek
2.60 – 2.80 low water flows·
2.80 – 3.00 moderate flows·
3.00 – 3.20 good fishing flow·
3.20 – 3.40 starting to rise·
3.40 – 3.60 High Water


Genesee River near Wellsville
100 – 200cfs Summer Flows Low water
200 – 300cfs Summer Flows Good Water
300 – 400cfs Spring Flows Fishable·
400 – 500cfs Spring Flows High Water·
650cfs + Stay Home


Cattaraugus Creek

Cattaraugus in Fall
100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Fishable Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs Stay Home Tie Flies


Cattaraugus in Spring

100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Normal Fishing Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs + Stay Home Tie Flies

Followers

Mirrored Minnow

Mirrored Minnow

Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner

Emilee's Spey

Emilee's Spey

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

Simple Sculpin

Simple Sculpin

Hairball

Hairball

Rabbit Leech

Rabbit Leech

Hare's Ear Wet

Hare's Ear Wet

Peacock Emerger

Peacock Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

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