WNY Fly Fishing Private Lessons

I offer private lessons for fly casting and fly tying, the cost in $60.00 per student for two hours for casting, equipment, knots and general fly fishing and $40.00 per student for fly tying; I supply all materials for the tying class. You must bring your own vise and tools. E mail me at jimguida@hotmail.com











About Me

My photo

I have been teaching fly fishing for about 25 years now and have made some great friends along the way, I also am a Umpqua Signature fly designer and a Pro Staffer for Scientific Anglers and Ross Reels

Flies For Sale

My Patterns are as follows: Guida's Mirrored Minnows $2.50 ea, Guida's White Lighting/Black Thunder $2.00 ea, Guida's Emerald Shiners $2.00 ea, Hairballs, sucker spawn, single eggs $.75 ea all orders must be in Qty's of 5's or 10's per style
e-mail orders to jimguida@hotmail.com

WNY Fly Fishing Trout Camps

We offer Trout Camps in the spring for inland trout. The classes are one day and cover casting, fly selection, and reading the water. We provide lunch, guides, flies/leaders/tippet, rods and reels if needed, you must bring waders and wading boots, sunglasses. This is the best way to start out fly fishing and learn from some of the best instructors in WNY.

Cost is $250.00 per person $350.00 per two
Please call Brian Slavinski for group rates
716-834-4331















Thursday, March 13, 2008

Fish Cognition and Behavior

By Culum Brown, Kevin N. Laland, Jens Krause

Of one interest is whether hatchery-reared fish retain the learned recognition of predators for relevant time frames. The fish demonstrated this, after high rates of predation for up to 3 weeks of stocking. They suggest after this period, hatchery-reared fish would have sufficient time to acquire the recognition of predators and/or learn appropriate avoidance behavior. Juvenile rainbow trout retain recognition of predators for at least 21 days, sufficient time for stocked fish to learn and recognize predators and how to avoid them.
That is to say, hatchery fish behave differently than natural fish, in the wild (I'll use the NOAA Fisheries terms for birth type: "wild" is born in the wild, "hatchery" is born in the hatchery, and "natural" is born in the wild of wild parents--hatchery ancestry is possible for all classes). Hatchery fish tend to school more, "hang out" higher in the water column, exert more energy pursuing food, and exert more energy while holding. This is not true if the fish are planted as eggs or very young. They tend to act as wild fish then. Basically, hatchery fish adapt to the hatchery. In studies where wild fish were introduced to hatchery ponds, they were badly out competed by the hatchery stock. Hatchery fish aren't stupid, they just learn how to be trout in an unnatural setting. Having said this, holdover fish can learn to be "real" trout, though will probably never be as good at surviving in nature as wild fish. Also, survivorship of hatchery-released fish is very low. Few will ever live to be holdovers.In terms of being able to tell the difference between hatchery and wild fish while/after you catch them, this is complicated. If the hatchery fish was recently stocked it will not fight like a wild fish (and may never). Hatchery fish are corralled and netted routinely, so they kind of get used to being handled. Also, they were bred to be easy to culture. Further, if you are born in (and live in) a stream you get better muscle development versus being reared in near-standing water in a concrete raceway. If the fish survives to be a holdover, this may become less of an issue. The color of a fish is also complicated. Often the differences in color you see are due to diet. People still don't know what the nutritional requirements of most fish are (as a result they just add fish meal, and assume it will have the necessary nutrients since it is from fish--often anchovettas(sp?) and other bait fish). Many of the striking colors in a Salmonid come from pigments that are ingested. For instance, rainbows don't get pink flesh or stripes if they don't get the proper diet. Hatchery foods can now be purchased with canthaxanthin (a red/orange pigment), but the fish still don't get as bright. Once a hatchery fish lives in nature for some time, it will look like it is wild, due to diet changes. Having said this, there are many strains/races/subspecies of the various Salmonidae, and as a result, two specimens of the same species can look quite different (not to mention individual/genetic color differences). So, if the strain being stocked in your home water was originally acquired from a very different population, you could see color differences between the natural/wild and hatchery fish. If there was a genetic bottleneck in the population's past, this could increase the consistent, unique colorations of the population. So, you may be right about the color differences between stocked/wild fish, or you may not be. Probably, you wouldn't be able to differentiate between wild/hatchery fish based on color after it was in the wild water for some time. Also, if hatchery fish are introduced to a place, and they can breed, they will. I guarantee that the fish of Little J have a fair amount of "hatchery genes" in them. This would lead to intermediate phenotypes, making differentiation even more difficult. In response to wild fish learning from being caught, a recent study showed that statistically you will not catch the same fish more than once or twice. That is not to say you never catch a fish more than once, it just becomes more difficult each time the fish is caught. This is true for hatchery fish as well. However, it will probably take them longer to catch on as they were handled in a hatchery, and as a result are more likely to "accept" such experiences as "normal." Of course, there is some speculation involved in this statement.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Total Pageviews

Search My Blog

WNY Hatch Chart

Name Size Dates
Stoneflies 10-18 April - September
B.W.O 18-22 April - September
Hendrickson 12-14 April - May
Black Caddis 16-18 March - May
Caddis 14-18 April - September
March Brown 10-12 May - June
Grey Fox 12-14 May - June
Sulpher 14-18 May - June
P.M.D. 16-20 May - June
Lt. Cahill 14-16 June - July
Green Drake 8-10 May - June
Isonchia 12-14 June - August
Yellow Stonefly 12-14 June - September
Hexagina 6-8 June - July
Trico 20-24 July - September

Ants 16-22 June - September
Beetles 12-16 June - September
Flying Ants 16-18 June - September
Hoppers 10-12 August
Crickets 10-12 August

USGS Height Gage

USGS Height Gage

Flow Rate Guide

Oatka Creek
2.60 – 2.80 low water flows·
2.80 – 3.00 moderate flows·
3.00 – 3.20 good fishing flow·
3.20 – 3.40 starting to rise·
3.40 – 3.60 High Water


Genesee River near Wellsville
100 – 200cfs Summer Flows Low water
200 – 300cfs Summer Flows Good Water
300 – 400cfs Spring Flows Fishable·
400 – 500cfs Spring Flows High Water·
650cfs + Stay Home


Cattaraugus Creek

Cattaraugus in Fall
100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Fishable Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs Stay Home Tie Flies


Cattaraugus in Spring

100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Normal Fishing Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs + Stay Home Tie Flies

Followers

Mirrored Minnow

Mirrored Minnow

Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner

Emilee's Spey

Emilee's Spey

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

Simple Sculpin

Simple Sculpin

Hairball

Hairball

Rabbit Leech

Rabbit Leech

Hare's Ear Wet

Hare's Ear Wet

Peacock Emerger

Peacock Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Blog Archive