WNY Fly Fishing Private Lessons

I offer private lessons for fly casting and fly tying, the cost in $60.00 per student for two hours for casting, equipment, knots and general fly fishing and $40.00 per student for fly tying; I supply all materials for the tying class. You must bring your own vise and tools. E mail me at jimguida@hotmail.com











About Me

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I have been teaching fly fishing for about 25 years now and have made some great friends along the way, I also am a Umpqua Signature fly designer and a Pro Staffer for Scientific Anglers and Ross Reels

Flies For Sale

My Patterns are as follows: Guida's Mirrored Minnows $2.50 ea, Guida's White Lighting/Black Thunder $2.00 ea, Guida's Emerald Shiners $2.00 ea, Hairballs, sucker spawn, single eggs $.75 ea all orders must be in Qty's of 5's or 10's per style
e-mail orders to jimguida@hotmail.com

WNY Fly Fishing Trout Camps

We offer Trout Camps in the spring for inland trout. The classes are one day and cover casting, fly selection, and reading the water. We provide lunch, guides, flies/leaders/tippet, rods and reels if needed, you must bring waders and wading boots, sunglasses. This is the best way to start out fly fishing and learn from some of the best instructors in WNY.

Cost is $250.00 per person $350.00 per two
Please call Brian Slavinski for group rates
716-834-4331















Sunday, March 2, 2008

Pros Say Game Fish are Getting Smarter

By BRENT FRAZEE of the Kansas City Star
Published Monday, March 19, 2007

There’s no doubt that fishermen are becoming better educated.
But is it possible that the fish are, too?
Denny Brauer certainly thinks so. He is convinced that the more fishermen learn, the more the prey learns, too.
"There’s no doubt in my mind that we’ve educated the fish," said Brauer, a top bass pro from Camdenton. "In the old days, you could go down to a bank with a spinner bait and catch all the bass you’d want. It’s not that way anymore.
"The fish have seen it all. They have seen a lot of different lures and different techniques, and they react. We’ve conditioned them. That’s why it’s so important to keep looking for new ways and places to catch them."
Rick Clunn, another legendary bass fisherman, agrees. He, too, has seen signs that the bass are learning just as quickly as the fishermen.
"There is an extra variable now - fishing pressure," Clunn said. "A lot of these fish have been caught and released, and they’ve learned. Fish are a lot like deer. When they feel pressure, they’ll avoid it.
"I believe that’s why we’re not finding them in a lot of the places where we used to. They’re still out there, but they’re being pushed to more subtle places. They’re reacting to the fishing pressure."
Educated fish, some might find it hard to believe that a creature with a brain the size of a grape can become an Einstein. Fisheries biologists say it really isn’t that way. They say the fish, if anything, become conditioned. When they have a negative experience - say, being stung by a hook - they react.
In most cases, a fish’s memory is short-term. But if it is caught and released often enough, it can become conditioned. And that can shape behavior.
Luckily, there are other factors at work - weather, barometric pressure, and water temperature, to name a few - that can trigger aggression and cause a fish to hit. But fishermen know that fishing pressure can be a factor.
"I believe the conditioning factor is real," said Al Lindner, a fisherman from Brainerd, Minn., who founded "In-Fisherman" magazine. "Species such as bass and muskies that are exposed to a lot of intelligent fishing pressure definitely will change behavior. I’ve seen it many times.
"That’s why the good fisherman is continually adjusting, like going to more subtle presentations with smaller baits or by going to the grotesquely large baits. You’re trying to present something the fish haven’t seen before."
Though there have been few studies documenting a fish’s reaction to fishing pressure, fisheries biologists also believe it has an effect on their behavior. But they shy away from drawing conclusions.
They say fishing pressure might be one of many factors affecting fish behavior.
"Fishing pressure does present challenges for us from a management standpoint," said Mike Kruse, fisheries program supervisor for the Missouri Department of Conservation. "Sometimes, fishing success doesn’t match what we find in our surveys."
Gene Gilliland, a noted fisheries biologist for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, doesn’t deny that negative experiences can affect fish behavior. But he, too, thinks there is many other influences, some of which man might not fully understand yet.
"I talked to another fisheries biologist who went diving one time to observe how bass reacted to the lures cast their way," Gilliland said. "They watched lure after lure come right past them, and they wouldn’t even move.
"But all of a sudden, it was like a light switch and they started hitting the same type of lure they had seen an hour earlier. The biologist tried to tie it to solar/lunar tables, the barometer, the weather, all kinds of things, but he couldn’t find anything. "More than anything, that told me we still have a way to go before we understand why fish act the way they do

2 comments:

  1. According to natural selection fish should be getting smarter, why would nature pick the dumb to survive and pass their genes on? As for the lack of new pics Jim, Im in the process of giving fishing up and picking up bocce ball as a full time hobby

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bocce Ball and beer full time count me in

    ReplyDelete

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WNY Hatch Chart

Name Size Dates
Stoneflies 10-18 April - September
B.W.O 18-22 April - September
Hendrickson 12-14 April - May
Black Caddis 16-18 March - May
Caddis 14-18 April - September
March Brown 10-12 May - June
Grey Fox 12-14 May - June
Sulpher 14-18 May - June
P.M.D. 16-20 May - June
Lt. Cahill 14-16 June - July
Green Drake 8-10 May - June
Isonchia 12-14 June - August
Yellow Stonefly 12-14 June - September
Hexagina 6-8 June - July
Trico 20-24 July - September

Ants 16-22 June - September
Beetles 12-16 June - September
Flying Ants 16-18 June - September
Hoppers 10-12 August
Crickets 10-12 August

USGS Height Gage

USGS Height Gage

Flow Rate Guide

Oatka Creek
2.60 – 2.80 low water flows·
2.80 – 3.00 moderate flows·
3.00 – 3.20 good fishing flow·
3.20 – 3.40 starting to rise·
3.40 – 3.60 High Water


Genesee River near Wellsville
100 – 200cfs Summer Flows Low water
200 – 300cfs Summer Flows Good Water
300 – 400cfs Spring Flows Fishable·
400 – 500cfs Spring Flows High Water·
650cfs + Stay Home


Cattaraugus Creek

Cattaraugus in Fall
100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Fishable Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs Stay Home Tie Flies


Cattaraugus in Spring

100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Normal Fishing Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs + Stay Home Tie Flies

Followers

Mirrored Minnow

Mirrored Minnow

Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner

Emilee's Spey

Emilee's Spey

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

Simple Sculpin

Simple Sculpin

Hairball

Hairball

Rabbit Leech

Rabbit Leech

Hare's Ear Wet

Hare's Ear Wet

Peacock Emerger

Peacock Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

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