WNY Fly Fishing Private Lessons

I offer private lessons for fly casting and fly tying, the cost in $60.00 per student for two hours for casting, equipment, knots and general fly fishing and $40.00 per student for fly tying; I supply all materials for the tying class. You must bring your own vise and tools. E mail me at jimguida@hotmail.com











About Me

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I have been teaching fly fishing for about 25 years now and have made some great friends along the way, I also am a Umpqua Signature fly designer and a Pro Staffer for Scientific Anglers and Ross Reels

Flies For Sale

My Patterns are as follows: Guida's Mirrored Minnows $2.50 ea, Guida's White Lighting/Black Thunder $2.00 ea, Guida's Emerald Shiners $2.00 ea, Hairballs, sucker spawn, single eggs $.75 ea all orders must be in Qty's of 5's or 10's per style
e-mail orders to jimguida@hotmail.com

WNY Fly Fishing Trout Camps

We offer Trout Camps in the spring for inland trout. The classes are one day and cover casting, fly selection, and reading the water. We provide lunch, guides, flies/leaders/tippet, rods and reels if needed, you must bring waders and wading boots, sunglasses. This is the best way to start out fly fishing and learn from some of the best instructors in WNY.

Cost is $250.00 per person $350.00 per two
Please call Brian Slavinski for group rates
716-834-4331















Tuesday, October 7, 2014

WNY Fly Fishing Gear Talk - Chest Pack Vs Vest

Years ago the only choice you had was a vest, today we have many choices: vest, chest pack , fanny pack, sling pack and other variations.
 
Many fisherman liked vests for the reason photographers do: you can stuff a lot of gear in their many pockets and still have both hands free.
The fishing vest was standard equipment for a very long time. Older models tended to be as long as waist-length jackets, but they have shortened up to keep the stuff in the lower pockets dry when wading deep.

Waist or lumbar packs are handy for the same reason fanny packs became popular with the general public: there’s nothing restricting your upper body, and the stuff you need is easily reached at waist level. Fishing models often have water bottle holders on either side, which can be handy.

 Sling packs have gained a lot with the two handed crew, as they have nothing in front to get in the way of casting.

Enter the chest pack, which seems to be the carry-all of choice among today’s anglers and mine. Popular brands include Umpqua, William Joseph and Fishpond, but just about any fly tackle company that sells vests now sells chest packs, now.
They are lighter and less restrictive than most vests – and they’re much easier to wear over a bulky coat when cold-weather fishing. They hold your gear out of the water in all but the deepest wading situations. Most are surprisingly roomy, but they still tend to reinforce the modern trend of carrying fewer fly boxes and accessories on the stream.  They also make it very easy to find and access most of your tackle for the days fishing.

Still, there are things a vest can do that a chest pack can’t. The most obvious is to provide an easy way to carry a portable rain jacket, a bottle of water and some food, all in the big pocket on the back.
But that need is met by another modern trend: fishing with a backpack. You see more of it today than ever before, and not just for fishing trips into the backcountry. A backpack has plenty of room for a coat, a camera, food, a first aid kit, water, bug spray, sunscreen and all the fly boxes an angler could want. You can wear it all day or slip it off and leave it on the bank near the water you’re fishing. You can buy a fancy sports model, complete with camelback drinking water supply, or you can make do with a basic book bag from a department store.

I  have used a Fishpond Double haul Chest Pack for the past 10 years now; it’s big enough for two or three fly boxes, along with leaders, strike indicators and split shot, but not so big that I can’t see my feet when walking or wading. It has a place for my hemostat, a place to pin on a zinger with a nipper, and I carry my spools of tippet on a holder. The real bonus is the backpack portion, which I use for my rain gear, and most important T.P. for emergencies on the water, it also will hold a water bladder for those who do long hikes in and out of remote fishing spots.

2 comments:

  1. Great post Jim! I have a Willy-J waist pack - which I absolutely love!!! - And carry a small back pack with other essentials. This works well for me as I often stop to fish pools and different holes and can set down my back pack, yet get full use out of my Willy-J pack that is chuck full of all my "go to" fly fishing gear.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes I agree great post. I personally use an Orvis waist pack, which I really like. I switched from my vest at the beginning of this year because I found myself cramming so much useless stuff making it heavy and cumbersome. As always keep the posts coming. Look forward to your next post.

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WNY Hatch Chart

Name Size Dates
Stoneflies 10-18 April - September
B.W.O 18-22 April - September
Hendrickson 12-14 April - May
Black Caddis 16-18 March - May
Caddis 14-18 April - September
March Brown 10-12 May - June
Grey Fox 12-14 May - June
Sulpher 14-18 May - June
P.M.D. 16-20 May - June
Lt. Cahill 14-16 June - July
Green Drake 8-10 May - June
Isonchia 12-14 June - August
Yellow Stonefly 12-14 June - September
Hexagina 6-8 June - July
Trico 20-24 July - September

Ants 16-22 June - September
Beetles 12-16 June - September
Flying Ants 16-18 June - September
Hoppers 10-12 August
Crickets 10-12 August

USGS Height Gage

USGS Height Gage

Flow Rate Guide

Oatka Creek
2.60 – 2.80 low water flows·
2.80 – 3.00 moderate flows·
3.00 – 3.20 good fishing flow·
3.20 – 3.40 starting to rise·
3.40 – 3.60 High Water


Genesee River near Wellsville
100 – 200cfs Summer Flows Low water
200 – 300cfs Summer Flows Good Water
300 – 400cfs Spring Flows Fishable·
400 – 500cfs Spring Flows High Water·
650cfs + Stay Home


Cattaraugus Creek

Cattaraugus in Fall
100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Fishable Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs Stay Home Tie Flies


Cattaraugus in Spring

100 – 250cfs Low Water Flow·
250 – 400cfs Good Fishing Flow·
400 – 650cfs Normal Fishing Flow·
650 – 800cfs High Water Flow·
800 – 1000cfs Very High Water Flow·
1000 – 1200cfs + Stay Home Tie Flies

Followers

Mirrored Minnow

Mirrored Minnow

Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner

Emilee's Spey

Emilee's Spey

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

Simple Sculpin

Simple Sculpin

Hairball

Hairball

Rabbit Leech

Rabbit Leech

Hare's Ear Wet

Hare's Ear Wet

Peacock Emerger

Peacock Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

Sulpher Emerger

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